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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> then pulling the plug on pakistan. we're holding back hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. will that make them a better ally or push them into the arms of our enemy? >>> joining me now from capitol hill to discuss the top story we've been talking about, is cnn congressional correspondent kate bolduan. have they had any breakthrough in the negotiations? they just talk, talk, talk. >> i often feel like i'm repeating myself. we have to tell you, there's no breakthroughs to report this evening. the meeting at the white house lasted about an hour and 45 minutes. i'm told from congressional sources that the focus was largely on the framework that had kind of been identified and come to pass in the biden talks. these are talks that were bipartisan talks that lasted for weeks and fell apart. republicans saying that there was an impasse having to do with taxes, in that package of savings, if you will, that was identified. it was largely had to do with spending cuts. republicans, by their math, said they had come to about $2 trillion plus in savings, but the president disputed their math saying acc
, pakistan telling america, keep your money, after the u.s. announced it's withholding $800 million in military aid. this is more evidence of the growing rift between the u.s. and pakistan. white house chief of staff william daly says it's in response to pakistan's decision to cut back on counterterrorism operations after the killing of osama bin laden. the u.s. typically gives pakistan more than $2 billion a year in security assistance. >>> u.s. joint chiefs of staff admiral -- chairman admiral mike mullen says china should no longer be described as a rising power, declaring it's a full-fledged world power hp he made the remarks at the start of a four-day visit to beijing. he called on china to become a global partner in addressing security challenges in asia and beyond. >>> jay si dugard speaking about her 18 years in captivity at the hands of philly and nancy garrido. she was 11 when kidnapped by garrido, a convicted sex offender, as she was walking to school. she talked about the long, horrifying ordeal with abc's diane sawyer. >> you would never know what she survived unless yo
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
to stand up and do the tough things. >> let me turn to pakistan, quickly, there's an article in the "new york times" today, saying that the money is being reduced to pakistan, hundreds of billions of dollars. the president came in, saying that he would agree to bring pakistan to the table with more aid. has that policy failed and is therera change of policy now? >> it's not changed -- it's not failed, pardon me. the truth of the matter is, our relationship with pakistan has been complicated. obviously, they're an important ally on the fight of terrorism. a victim of enormous amounts of terrorism. right now they've taken steps to given us reason to pause on the aid which we're giving to the military and we're trying to work through that. it's a complicated relationship and a very difficult complicated part of the board. obviously there's still a lot of pain that the political system in pakistan is feeling by virtue of the raid that we did to get osama bin laden. something that the president felt strongly about. we have no regrets over. but the pakistani relationship is difficult, but it m
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
leaders in pakistan and yemen. >> i think we have them on the run. i think now is the moment. now is the moment following what happened with what happened to bin laden to put maximum pressure on them because, i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can cripple al-qaida as a threat to this country. >> and the secretary's schedule in afghanistan is packed and first the meeting with the top u.s. commander general petraeus here and holding a face to face with afghan hamid karzai. they want to with draw 23,000 troops. >> david piper is on the phone from kabul. >> the newly appointed defense secretary arrive went straight in the talks with afghan president karzai and he said the draw down of u.s. troops. he hopes to drive the taliban to peace talks in that period so there can be a reconcilation in this country and the defense secretary w upbeat about killing out al-qaida. >> targeting the new al-qaida chief saw al-zawahri. he said the al-qaida leader may be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas . general petraeus who leaves the post this month to lea
in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al sar zawahiri. they said they're not happy with their actions and-- >> they're ratting us out when we go to the leaders. >> dave: they've kicked out military trainers. >> mike: it's hard to give money to people, maybe a segment of the pakistan military was harboring osama bin laden for goodness sake. >> ainsley: time for the headlines. two tennessee national guard members are dead after their helicopter goes down. the chopper crashed during a routine training flight. the chopper hit power lines on the way down, knocking out power to thousands of residents there as well. no word yet on the cause. the pilots were in an oh-58-d kiowa helicopter the subject of a lawsuit allegedly, alleging a faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes near camp david where president obama is staying. it happened at separate times. both planes were escorted to nearby airports and they say the first plane had been out of radio communication. no word why the cessna got so close. the third time this month that pla
. that always raises the spector of the isi in pakistan. >> still photos seem to confirm early reports that the plot relied on improvised explosive devices or ied's plabilitied in parked cars. an attack often associated with afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. but, again tonight there is still no immediate claim of responsibility. that's the same pattern we saw back in 2008, trace. >> trace: catherine, this could effect the united states as well, right? >> as soon as the story broke, the focus was on these similarities with the attack in 2008. that was a rampage that was surprisingly low tech. it relied on 10 pakistani militants armed with cell phones, handguns and backpacks filled with explosives. the group with links to pakistani intelligence was ultimately blamed. leading analysts warn to jumping to any conclusions. >> if the attack were caused to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major complications for the united states. we don't want to see those two countries go into another crisis and fight another war which they have done three times in the past. >
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
pakistan, as we said on the show a number of times. how do we deal with pakistan and at the same time, get out of afghanistan except in terms of special forces or drones to represent our interest and chase down terrorists? meanwhile, you have the greatest tender box in the world, to save a nuclear pakistan with more than 100, probably twice as many with nuclear warheads that can fall into the hands of terrorists. >> the bottom line is, how do we deal with it? >> it's always pakistan is a basket case, a nuclear basket case. stay in afghanistan. >> you don't. you don't. >> it's not going to work. that is washington's argument, mike barnicle. pakistan is stabilized. we have to keep having american troops killed in afghanistan. it doesn't add up. invading cambodia is the right move when you are going into vietnam. >> continuing argument and keep making it because less than 1% of american families and american people are serving in the military in afghanistan. >> there you go. >> back to the draft. >> untouched. >> we need a draft. >> we'll come back the dr. aidan quinn. [ male announcer ] memb
. he says the u.s. has identified 10 to 20 key al qaeda leaders whom he says are in pakistan, yemen and other areas. >>> al qaeda is making a comeback in afghanistan. u.s. commanders are seeing a sudden resurgence just as american troops are getting ready to leave. cnn's nick payton walsh joined an army patrol on the hunt. >> reporter: almost a decade in the hunt for al qaeda in one part of eastern afghanistan looks like this. americans pushing the afghans to the front, taking the high ground in hills impossible to police. the pressure for less americans here is extreme, but the afghans only mustered five men for this patrol. >> it has to be five to seven round bursts and go. >> reporter: and despite this training, policing the local villages, let alone taking on the terrorist network that america came here to eradicate. it is here that afghanistan's future looks like its past. american control does not extend up to this valley and high on the ridgelines, they found safe havens for al qaeda. they have revealed to cnn they located here al qaeda fighters using the secluded alpine vill
and influenced china in term which influenced india which may be influencing pakistan. that same pattern may be beginning to happen in africa as we have some real success stories in other countries thinking if rwanda can do it, why can't we? >> we'll have to leave it at that. thank you very much. we will be right back. >> if i can finish now -- oh, yes, why don't you meow when i woman does that. between accoun, so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even deposit checks right from your phone. just take a picture, hit deposit and you're done. open an account today and put schwab mobile to work for you. >>> canada pulled the last of the combat troops out of afghanistan this week. this brings us to our question of the week. how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assistance force? is it a, 6, b, 16, c, 26 or d 46. stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/gps for ten more questions. while yo
influenced india, which may be influencing pakistan. that same pattern may be beginning to happen in africa, as we have some real success stories, and others countries say, if rwanda can do it, if ghana can do it, why can't we? >> we'll have to leave it at that. thank you very much. >>> we will be right back. woman: saving for our child's college fund was getting expensive. man: yes it was. so to save some money, we taught our 5 year old how to dunk. woman: scholarship! woman: honey go get him. anncr: there's an easier way to save. get online. go to geico.com. get a quote. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. >>> can a day pulled the last of its troops out of afghanistan this week. that brings us to our question of the week -- how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assist tansz force? is it 6, 16, 26 or 46? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. make sure you go to cnn.com/gps for ten more question and make sure you check out the global public square don't forget, you can also follow us on twitter and fac
the border in pakistan is a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban i know. they're getting gutsy. right past there. if you go past that you're going to take enemy contact, it's pretty certain. >> the afghans are clear about who lay in weight for them ahead. >> translator: it's very dangerous, there are taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading. nick payton walsh, cnn afghanistan. here at quicken loans, we like to go the extra mile for our clients. with the wassman family, it was 2,500 extra miles. we're the wassman family from skagway, alaska. livin' so far out and not
of strategically feeting al qaeda. he says the u.s. identified 10 to 20 leaders who he says are in pakistan, yemen and in other areas. >>> and one new nation in the world, two big celebrations marking independence day. this is the flag of the now independent nation of south sudan, rising for the first time over the capital city of juba. the country is officially separate today after five decades of on and off civil war with the mostly muslim north. the same flag rising today in washington, d.c. over the new embassy of south sudan. >>> so let's talk about that moment some more, that scene of the flag rising above the new embassy of south sudan in washington. elise abbott is the senior state department producer. that scene almost as important as the celebration in south sudan. lots of symbolism that comes here and a real commitment too between the u.s. and south sudan. >> that's right. the u.s. really for decades has been working to help south sudan for this moment. the u.s. really under the bush administration started pushing this agreement, this comprehensive peace agreement between south and nort
that are being persecuted in countries like pakistan. and we -- >> on of your business? that's interesting. investigation continues tomorrow night. what are we going to see tomorrow? >> reporter: tomorrow how he makes a business out of his expertise. how these donation toss his cause end up with a so-called foundation owned by his business partner. and also the bigger question, anderson, why are our taxpayers going to pay this guy? he can say whatever he wants, but where are the people vetting these so-called terrorism experts that are suddenly making a lot of money in this country? >> that's interesting. drew, fascinating. we'll continue to follow up. we'll have that report part two tomorrow. >>> coming up, you may not have been following the war in libya recently. but tonight you are going to get as close to the come bass as anyone can. our ben wedeman and his crew caught in the crossfire today. and the video of it is heart-stopping. >> guys? alec? as fast as we can. we can't tell who the -- >> going to show you the full video what happened. we'll talk to ben. he was able to get out, his
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
of millions of dollars in aid to pakistan. unless that nations pursues militant groups more aggressively. on his first visit to afghanistan as secretary of defense leon panetta said yesterday that the defeat of al qaeda is within reach. panetta says eliminating as few as ten of the terrorists' top figures could cripple its ability to strike. citizens of the world's newest nation, the republic of south sudan celebrated their independence yesterday. the u.s. delegation to the festivities included former secretary of state colin powell who helped broker the end of sudan's civil war in 2005. the search for seven missing americans goes on this morning off the coast of baja california. they were on a boat that capsized last week in the sea of cortez. the mexican navy says the men may be on one of the area's barrier islands. in sports, the wait is over. more than 50,000 fans in new york's yankee stadium enjoyed an "i was there" moment yesterday when derek jeter stroked his,000th career hit. >> announcer: deep to left field. >> osgood: a home run over the left field wall. jeter is the 28th playe
to be across the border in pakistan is again a concern, back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we push down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high tech american attack helicopters buzzed overyaed until militants shot from them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban. they're getting pretty gutsy. if you push up any farther past that, you're going to take enemy contact, that's pretty certain. >> the afghans clear about who lay in wait ahead of them. >>. >> translator: it's very draws, taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. >> al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading slipping back in, just when america makes its case to leave. >>> president obama is urging congressional negotiators to be open mined when he sits down with them at the white house tomorrow. he spoke about the standoff today during a t
for heat as it said it sanctioned a journali journalist. his reports about links between pakistan's security agencies and muslim extremists. mullen said thursday he has not seen anything to, quote, disabuse the report that he knew about shazad's death. basically that means he thinks he knew but he didn't have proof. they call mullen's comments irresponsible. >>> tens of thousands of protestors poured into tehrer square in cairo today to pressure the government to slow reforms. some groups say they'll protest in the square for 18 days, which was the length of the revolution. >>> and there was tragedy at a texas rangers game. look at that video, that fan falling 20 feet to a concrete area behind the scoreboard at rangers ballpark. he was reaching for a ball thrown by rangers outfielder josh hamilton. the man was raisced to the hospital but he died. the rangers said their thoughts and prayers are with the man's family. a man was injured last year after falling about 30 feet trying to catch a foul ball. >>> they are willing to cut social security if republicans agree to increase taxes
now for panetta is to keep attacking al qaeda in pakistan, yemen, and somalia. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda. as a threat to this country. >> the u.s. has long said it believes al qaeda remains very interested in high-profile attacks and would like nothing better than to bring down a u.s. aircraft. apparently, osama bin laden was even talking about assembling a team of operatives. but of course, those navy s.e.a.l.s killed him in the compound before he could carry out the plan any further. >> general petraeus, i take it is getting ready to leave afghanistan, heading over to the cia? >> very soon. in fact, the change of command ceremony that will turn everything over in afghanistan to marine corps general john allen will take place monday morning in kabul. petraeus will get on a plane, come back to the united states, retire from years of service in the active duty army, and, in fact, in the coming weeks will do exactly that. take over
al-qaeda move money and fighters in to pakistan and afghanistan. here now, a spokesman for four u.s. ambassadors. thanks for being with us. we known about their support of terror groups throughout the years, hezbollah and others but what about al-qaeda is this is the first time we've had solid evidence? >> it's actually not the first time. the four individuals that were designated in 2009. don't forget that the 9/11 commission report called out this phenomenon, said that al-qaeda and iran are working together. i think thursday's announcement is good news. we should congratulate david cohenfor making this announcement and pushing through this decision. i'm sure it was very difficult. the state department under secretary clinton has not been so forth right. hopefully by designating the six individuals that we can move the diplomacy and force a lost these countries that are protecting terrorists by not enforcing banking laws. certainly the u.n. has asked them to enforce banking laws. >> gregg: i'm glad you brought up the united nations. when it comes to fighting terrorism is the unit
and operations really pick up in places like yemen and somalia. of course, top concerns always pakistan and what's going on inside that country and north korea and perhaps the number one target, if you will, for gathering intelligence about what they are up to may well be iran. the u.s. believes iran is really trying to extend its influence in both afghanistan and iraq and around the world. there will be a lot of effort over the coming years to see what iran is up to. general petraeus in charge of all of that now as director petraeus. we will see if he gives up the nickname he had for so many years since he attended west point where his cadet, fellow cadet buddies, used to call him peaches petraeus. >> where's the peaches come from? >> you know, guys at the academy, they just sort of make stuff up. i found out recently that amongst his buddies, his fellow former cadets, many of them now two, three, four-star generals themselves, that name peaches petraeus has stuck over the years. close friends, amongst others, maybe behind his back. not too much to his face. he's often called king david petraeu
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)